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File 134575630513.jpg - (64.06KB , 336x447 , ponderings.jpg )
16448 No. 16448 [Edit]
Ponderings general 2. Post things you've thought about.

Previous thread >>15685
828 posts omitted. Last 50 shown. Expand all images
>> No. 42233 [Edit]
Could we get a reset for this year? This month sucketh for me....
* New Year earthquake in JP; one of my friends was touring Japan at the time. He wasn't at the earthquake zone but his plans are all out of whack.
* Neighbour's dad and dog died.
* Birthday party cancelled due to pnuemonia.
* My grandma is sick.
Please allow for a return.

Ok, thanks. Bye.
>> No. 42236 [Edit]
File 170585552621.jpg - (534.49KB , 1428x2048 , 8601a58a336a63bac3aec0c33ceb8ecd.jpg )
42236
I don't like watching streams live, and I think I know why now. It's like being mute and ostensibly having a conversation, but the other person is just talking at you. Because there's a chat box, there's this false pretense that you have a voice in the conversation, but you're actually competing with hundreds for one person's attention. If you give them money, they'll read your question or comment, but they also respond to people who don't pay sometimes. It feels incredibly unbalanced and ultimately pointless. I'd rather have a normal conversation, and I bet streaming wouldn't be nearly as popular if there weren't so many people who lack a normal social life.
>> No. 42237 [Edit]
>>42236
It's called parasocial for a reason. It's even worse than how shallow conversations usually go anyway. We are living in the shadows of shadows of shadows, and even though sometimes new fantasies emerge to creep from the virtual into the real world, we just lose so much in the process it's not a miracle all of us are touched by melancholy.
>> No. 42238 [Edit]
>>42236
Well put. Worse yet is when they have chats that move so quickly that if you blink you'd miss a dozen comments. In those cases why bother at all?
>> No. 42239 [Edit]
>>42236
That's a cool drawing. The more reasonable people online say they use it as background noise to avoid loneliness but I prefer playing music.
>> No. 42241 [Edit]
>>42236
I like to watch livestreams occasionally, but it's always streams were less than 5-6 viewers at a time. Often you're the only person typing in the chat, so you do build that level of rapport.
>> No. 42256 [Edit]
There is so much deliciously lewd fanart of girls I'm not familiar with (usually from popular gacha or fots anime) posted every day. However, I still prefer to take care of my needs looking at characters I know.
>> No. 42257 [Edit]
>>42256
For me it's the other way around, I can't bring myself to look at characters I treasure with anything but pure eyes. I prefer to satisfy lust with those random gacha characters I don't even know the names of.
>> No. 42265 [Edit]
I thought this thread had reached bump limit already, have we created ponderings thread 3 too soon?
>> No. 42274 [Edit]
>>42257
It depends on the character and art. The more I like them the harder it is to find art that isn't distasteful. I don't mind doing it because I'm of the opinion that it can be a form of love, tenshi-types deserve love too.

Post edited on 4th Feb 2024, 2:43pm
>> No. 42345 [Edit]
File 17082204324.jpg - (52.03KB , 304x267 , sousa.jpg )
42345
I never really understood why fansubbing and scanlation became such a big phenomenon.

I'm not talking about bootlegs where the goal is to make money, but the stuff people upload for free.

I was told that it started out at college campuses with students passing around VHS tapes. I get that, because I assume the translators wanted to show this cool stuff to people around them, and watching the end product together in some dorm room was just as much a social event as was making the subs.

I can also understand translating one particular work that means a lot to you and that likely would never get a translation otherwise. For a while, I myself contemplated translating two somewhat obscure series I was very fond of.

But sitting alone in your room, working at breakneck speed to do same-day subs of random mediocre shows that you hardly even enjoy watching, for no pay and for little to no recognition from anyone you've ever met in person, and doing this for years on end?

I can't understand the mindset of those people.
>> No. 42346 [Edit]
>>42345
>working at breakneck speed to do same-day subs of random mediocre shows that you hardly even enjoy watching
Which sub groups did same day subs? At least for shows I watched I recall they were usually a day or two late. And you're probably underestimating the recognition aspect, if recognition were a trivial-issue then there wouldn't be any sub drama. Forget fansubbing, people used to do things like non-trivial cracks (for software, games) just for the fame of it.
>> No. 42347 [Edit]
>>42345
I was never really part of it but had a lot of friends in the space. The main motivators seemed to be:
1) Clout, especially back in the pre-simulcast era when getting speedsubs out was bragging rights
2) All your friends are there doing subs so you also do
3) They got used to doing it as habit
>> No. 42348 [Edit]
>>42346
>Which sub groups did same day subs?
I don't remember the names of the specific groups, I just remember /a/ talking about it now and then.
I only watched like 10 shows with English or Spanish subtitles before I learned Japanese.
>Forget fansubbing, people used to do things like non-trivial cracks (for software, games) just for the fame of it.
Cracking programs is probably very fun if you like challenging puzzles. It's also a skill that you can gradually get better at by doing it.
I've contributed to several open source apps, and I think programming can be very fun when you're not under pressure to release some product before a deadline, so I get that there are other motivations than just immediate monetary gain.

btw, half of the Perl ecosystem for asynchronous stuff was developed by one autist for his fansubbed anime server:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oe5fCzQtVsg

Unless you're really excited about the particular thing you're working on, translation work and subtitle timing etc. on the other hand is just tedious busywork once you've learned to use your tools and found a workflow, or at least to me it is. It's no wonder that nowadays so much of the job has already been mechanized by machine translations.
>> No. 42367 [Edit]
Recently, I decided to skim through How to Win Friends and Influence people for the shits and giggles since it's a pretty well-known book. One of the themes I noticed was that it was mostly about people pleasing. I realized a lot of it I had already been doing despite never having read the book. I didn't like the way that the book approached things. In my opinion, if you simply try to appease the person, let them take the lead, and let them feel like they are the center, then I think it leads to the potential where it leads to a dynamic where the person doesn't actually like you but spends time around you because you make them feel good about themselves - they are using you, essentially. I also feel like it leads to inadequate boundary setting. I've almost noticed that the techniques in this book almost mirror the description of "fawning" in Pete Walker's CPTSD related book, where you simply try to appease people in order to avoid conflict as a protection mechanism. I guess the other thing is that other people aren't that stupid and can pick up when you're trying to schmooze them, and since this book is pretty known, people are aware of these tactics. I feel like a lot of these self-help books are bullshit or are common sense.
>> No. 42368 [Edit]
>>42367
>How to Win Friends and Influence people
Ah the playbook for used car salesmen.
>> No. 42369 [Edit]
>>42367
It's outdated. I believe that's the book that started the self-help genre before the 50's even. They are common sense depending on your experience and the authors, who are usually rich CEOs and got lucky in life, only write them to satisfy their ego or to make more money, their advice doesn't apply to the average person. Some are ghostwritten or promote magical beliefs/BS.
There are exceptions, of course. The infamous "48 laws of power" is written by someone who used to work in Hollywood and was tired of the fake nice advice in them. Some of the laws are obvious and the poetic style can be a turn off. He uses historical examples in every law so it's a fun history book to read before bed in my eyes haha, I never finished it
>> No. 42370 [Edit]
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42370
>>42369
>10. Infection: Avoid the Unhappy and Unlucky
>Avoid surrounding yourself with those who are unhappy and unlucky. Their negative energy will only bring you down.
We're all failing this one.
>> No. 42371 [Edit]
>>42369
Hmm, I've heard of this one, but I hadn't considered reading it. I almost hate shit like this, though, because it's so damn manipulative. I loathe fakeness and ingenuineness. At the same time, too much of the opposite is not good, either. However, I'm reminded of normalfags and how they operate. Do I really want to operate like a normalfag? Actually, I think these sorts of behaviors are what I hate most about people who are referred to as "psychopaths" - this sort of manipulativeness. It feels like such a weight to carry. I hate social games so much, even if they can bring me benefit.
>> No. 42380 [Edit]
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42380
Do you think Japanese being generally bad at English is intentional, as a means of insulating Japan from foreign influence? They have to know they're one of the worst in the world when it comes to English, and there's no way they couldn't find a better way to teach it than whatever they do now.
>> No. 42382 [Edit]
>>42380
Right, it has the net effect of serving as a soft "firewall" without their needing to actually implement any draconian China-like GFW. So if one was a conspiracy theorist you could probably say that the government surely knows that their existing English education programs have a terrible track record, but they have no motivation to change it for the above reasons.

Unfortunately the widespread availability of LLMs for translation will weaken that firewall anyhow.
>> No. 42386 [Edit]
>>42380
No. Public English education anywhere is bad in general with a few exceptions, more so if they use a vastly different writing system. As an ESL, most people I know who have a decent grasp of English here spent a lot of their free time on the internet and took specialized classes or could afford to travel abroad.
I assume good English education that works is reserved for private schools everywhere, including Japan. Popular language teaching methods are outdated and new ones are hard to implement because it would require convincing someone with an authority who could execute a reform that... popular intuitive methods like tests, extensive grammar study, drills, etc. don't work as much as people think
>>42382
>LLM
I think people underestimate how powerful MTL were berofe them. If there was going to be a big change it would have happened by now. You see apps that can MTL what you type/tell them instantly already but they aren't perfect and given how hard it would be even for a LLM to pick up constantly developing slang and grammar in different languages with all its uses, I doubt we'll see a big change anytime soon.
Companies using LLM to essentially do a slight better version of an official MTL still need to hire a quality checker with knowledge of the language if they want to 100% avoid errors. Similar to artists correcting their AI assisted illustrations, except MTLs already existed years before stable diffusion.
>> No. 42388 [Edit]
>>42386
>Public English education anywhere is bad in general with a few exceptions
India seems to do decently well at English education, as do most parts of the EU? Although that might just be because they're more connected with the anglosphere so they end up learning by osmosis or out of necessity.

>underestimate how powerful MTL were before
That's not the case: before deep-learning, most MTL was pretty poor in general, especially for languages whose grammar diverged from English even slightly. It's only around the 2010s that architectures such as LSTMs and RNNs showed promise in terms of language modeling, surpassing the SOTA of more bespoke statistical NLP systems at that time. Seq2Seq was one of the most prominent examples here.

These RNN/LSTM models were decent-ish for "English-like" languages yet they still lacked the semantic modeling capabilities that are needed for implicit-context-heavy languages like Japanese. It's only with the advent of transformer based models (e.g. GPT) that this became a "solved" problem (well almost, now the issue is getting the inference cost down.)

>If there was going to be a big change it would have happened by now.
Not quite, widespread access to LLMs is bottlenecked by compute cost at the moment. But you can already see that e.g. DeepL is order of magnitudes better than google translate at Japanese (I don't believe the precise architecture of DeepL was ever revealed, but given their timing it's probably some Attention-based thing. It also helps that being spun out of Linguee they have a quality dataset.)

>apps that can MTL what you type/tell them instantly already
See above; with the exception of DeepL (which itself is still probably more primitive "small language models" instead of the massive behemoth that is llama/gpt-4/etc.), LLMs have not yet been widely deployed for MTL, mainly due to cost.

>given how hard it would be even for a LLM to pick up constantly developing slang
That is part of the beauty with LLMs, they can be fine-tuned fairly easily. Coupled with plentiful access to data (which admittedly might be harder to come by now that everyone is starting to silo APIs), this is actually the "easy part".

> LLM to essentially do a slight better version of an official MTL still need to hire a quality checker with knowledge of the language
This is correct; however it is a matter of scale, it is far easier to QC an existing translation than to come up with your own, so more scripts can be translated with fewer human employees.
>> No. 42389 [Edit]
>>42388
>(well almost, now the issue is getting the inference cost down.)
Sounds like a job for SNNs
https://medium.com/@hiiask/spiking-neural-networks-in-neuromorphic-computing-fe671061470a
>SNNs are >100x more efficient than the best recurrent ANN and 1000x more efficient than LSTM.
On traditional hardware though, it'll be markedly slower.
https://news.ucsc.edu/2023/03/eshraghian-spikegpt.html

Post edited on 2nd Mar 2024, 2:19pm
>> No. 42390 [Edit]
>>42389
>Sounds like a job for SNNs
Not too sure of this. I actually have not heard of SNNs before this, but the model seems actually fairly similar to standard topologies, only difference is that you have an accumulator added before the activation function.

Any claims of efficiency needed to be verified rigorously with an apples to apples comparison, if you're comparing dedicated hardware against a CPU implementation then of course the dedicated hardware will win out. I'm not convinced this "neuromorphic" hardware is any better than just the standard systolic-array architecture for matmul accelerator.
>> No. 42391 [Edit]
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42391
>>42390
>the model seems actually fairly similar to standard topologies, only difference is that you have an accumulator added before the activation function.
>Any claims of efficiency needed to be verified rigorously with an apples to apples comparison, if you're comparing dedicated hardware against a CPU implementation then of course the dedicated hardware will win out
I'm not familiar enough with neural networks to make those comparisons. I am taking an undergraduate class about neuromorphic computing though, and to paraphrase, my professor has said that in every task that's been tested, neuromorphic algorithms have been more energy efficient while being at least as accurate. I asked him if that was dependent on what hardware is used; he answered that while specialized hardware is faster, neuromorphic algorithms are more energy efficient on any hardware.

These are two of the papers him and a graduate student have written
https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8967864
https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/9340948

Post edited on 2nd Mar 2024, 3:14pm
>> No. 42392 [Edit]
>>42391
> I am taking an undergraduate class about neuromorphic computing
Something about teaching a highly specialized non-mainstream field like neuromorphic computing without introduction to more standard traditional architectures is setting off alarm bells. If you haven't learned traditional architectures you have no point of reference. (And unlike say economics where one could actually start off with something like Austrian economics as an introduction given that it's not like "mainstream" schools have had any better luck, traditional networks have by objective metrics succeeded in the real-world, whereas spiking neural networks have been nothing more than a curiosity in academia).

>in every task that's been tested, neuromorphic algorithms have been more energy efficient while being at least as accurate
Again sets off alarm bells. If this is the case _regardless of hardware_ then people would obviously have deployed them in the real world by now. Either one of those does not hold, or it only works for "toy models" and doesn't scale to real-world problems. There is not much standard literature on SNNs so I am not qualified to say either way, but it just doesn't pass the sniff test. Machine Learning is not one of those academia-gated groups: assuming you aren't compute bottlenecked, if there is a good idea then it will be borne out by real-world trials (see diffusion models and LLaMa, where a lot many improvements came from independent researchers).

I found [1] from Geoff Hinton who is definitely qualified to have an opinion(tm) on this field, he seems to say the hardware might have potential but we don't yet have the algorithms to train a SNN for problems that we care about. Which to me roughly makes sense, you can make some handwavy argument about non-linearity making it hard to derive gradients and thus meaning you can't do backpropagation.

[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EDP4v-9TUA&t=2809
>> No. 42393 [Edit]
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42393
>>42392
I took an intro to AI class, but that was about stuff like A*; the most advanced topic covered was perceptrons. There's a deep learning and a machine learning class too, but I wasn't able take those for scheduling reasons. None of these 4 classes are a prerequisite for another. *shrug*

I find your skepticism overly pessimistic though. It sounds like you think there's chicanery going on. There will be more progress and I don't see why SNNs can't be applied to machine translation.

edit: Backpropagation is also possible
https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.08378

Post edited on 2nd Mar 2024, 5:11pm
>> No. 42394 [Edit]
>>42388
>they're more connected with the anglosphere so they end up learning by osmosis or out of necessity.
I can agree with this correction. Citizens in the EU are often raised bilingual to be able to communicate with close neighboring countries. Compare that to Latam where the majority of countries speak Spanish and people can have a well-paid job or political position without basic knowledge of English.
Free basic English classes in culturally and geographically isolated countries outside of the anglosphere are often seen as a mandatory subject in schools due to English being considered the global language rather than a strict necessity (I'm including Japan in this). It isn't taken as seriously as it should be. For reference, dedicated online English speaking Japanese learning communities are aware of the issues with the way Japanese is commonly taught but that's a general popular language pedagogy problem, in my opinion.

>That's not the case: before deep-learning...
Well, I'm sorry. I made that post under the dumb assumption that GoogleTL still uses SMT and DeepL being SMT (I have it bookmarked but never go beyond the /translate page so I never noticed). I have to agree because I did notice online translators slowly becoming better over the 2010s growing up and honestly, I'm not knowledgeable about technology as you can tell, I had to google some abbreviations to fully understand that post. I'm only skeptical of them being able to collect data to pick up slang unless they can get it from SNSs, but we'll see.

Post edited on 3rd Mar 2024, 4:24am
>> No. 42395 [Edit]
>>42394
>being able to collect data to pick up slang unless they can get it from SNSs
Also even if that slang never appears in the training set, a lot of it can be inferred from context. Again one of the strengths of LLMs is that they can handle "out of distribution" tokens with grace, in a manner similar to a human would where context is used to derive the most likely "meaning" for that token.
>> No. 42406 [Edit]
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42406
I was lurking an old thread about imageboard addiction and one anon pointed out something I hadn't considered about their appeal among the repetitive posts. Besides being able to express yourself anonymously and a low commitment to conversation, it works as a way to create and be creative with the words and images you use, ¨The thrill begins when you start typing and ends when you click SUBMIT¨(or reply). When I first tried to limit my time on them years ago, switching to lurking worked. I didn't have to check to see if I got any replies and eventually I did something else. I'm taking this to heart because I've been procastinating and there are other creative projects I want to do in my free time.

>>42370
>>42371
#18 is the anti-neet law. I don't think it's a good idea to take that book seriously unless you are forced to deal with certain people or for self reflection.
>> No. 42408 [Edit]
Imageboards made me realize that hierarchies are not required for culture and norms to exist, and it made me wonder if it was possible for an imageboard without a distinct culture to exist. I was also considering how giving an individual an identity leads to distinction, which leads to classification and then the eventual formation of a hierarchy. However, I am unsure if imageboards are truly free of hierarchy. There are "mods" and "admins." Then, there are also tripfags. Another instance of this, is where those do not follow the board culture or unspoken rules are deemed as outsiders. But, contrary to this, the outsider may become the "insider" by simply lurking, getting to understand the culture, and refraining from using "outsider" language, which is something that can be changed. A lot of hierarchies in real life are often formed based on traits of individuals that are pre-determined by uncontrollable life circumstances or genetics. For instance, your wealth, your looks, and your race. There is also the thing in real life where an individual's status in a group is determined by how long they have been in the group. As a result of it, their thoughts and opinions will have greater weight than those who have a lower status. But, on imageboards this does not occur because everyone is anonymous, excluding moderators, admins, and places where anon is not forced. You never know truly who you are talking to. You may be arguing with one anon in a thread and then agreeing with him in another. My thoughts is that all imageboards have an individual "common writing style" where users unconsciouly adhere to a writing style that all of the other anons on the board use. I mean anonymity can be broken by having an overly unique posting style. Again, though, this can be remedied by simply lurking and absorbing the culture. But, to go back to my other train of thought - the idea of an imageboard without a unique culture - without gate-keeping, without having unspoken rules, without having norms, will this draw in the wrong sort of individuals - not the types of people you see on imageboards but those you might see on more common social media websites -- the types of individuals who are predisposed to form cliques. Is the differentiation of the "outsider" and the "insider" inevitable in imageboards?
>> No. 42409 [Edit]
>>42408
>an imageboard without a distinct culture to exist
An imageboard without a culture would just be entirely full of shitposting, since there would be no real "rules" to enforce I think. You would need some standard to hold the posters to otherwise you will have people kicked out of everywhere else, not to mention that people would run bots and spam and other such things, which would make the site ungovernable. I suppose that would be an imageboard without any real culture, unless you consider a complete lack of standards and chaos a 'culture', but it would be near unusable.

>Imageboards made me realize that hierarchies are not required for culture and norms to exist
I agree with the points you have raised, although I wouldn't really put tripfags in the hiearchy as they should be anons anytime they aren't using their trip for the designated purpose, but I do think the amount of time someone has spent on an imageboard will always be a contributing factor to the "hiearchy" as someone who has been around for a while, but again it isn't really much of a factor as you said it would be impossible to know just how long someone has been there, and going around bragging about being an oldfag who has been around 20 years is seen as uncouth in most places. Very much unlike the real world, where just on virtue of being someone for a while gives you authority over others, although this is dependant on the situation, more often than not there will be some authority to go with seniority.

>Is the differentiation of the "outsider" and the "insider" inevitable in imageboards
Yes, I think it is an inevitability, but on the other hand it's far easier to converse on an imageboard than anywhere else. In real life or on site such as twitter or reddit, it would be quite difficult to have any sort of meaningful discussion with someone, as sites like those are by their nature against the spirit of a completely unbound conversation, as you have to either have a brand new account or allow someone to view all your past discussions, tainting the conversation. You could identify someone based on posting style or identify someone based on the content of their posts, but usually it's an anonymous discussion unless you are intentionally bringing attention to yourself. I don't think it's a bad thing to have an outsider and insider differentiation, but in real life, as you said, it's very much based on factors far outside your control, and in many cases people will decide they dislike your or not based purely on appearance, discounting all else. This is true whether it's in a professional or academix context, or even when trying to make friends.

I also think that in general ford drivers have begun to tend towards violent outbursts, although I'm not sure whether this has been a recent development or not, I have noticed more "normal people" becoming increasingly aggravated and quick tempered. I think it's a natural result or how hectic the world has become, as most people can't keep up so they either turn to drugs or they are eternally on edge and ready to snap, taking their anger out even when there was no need to do so. I had a recent interaction with someone, and what had been a simple, and what I had thought innocent, question resulted in them becoming aggravated with me over a misunderstanding on their part, with them swearing at me in anger and accusing me of attempting to trick them. This is someone I've had some interaction with before, although I was not remotely close to being their friend, and I suppose it just starkly reminded me how quick people are to snap when you are perceived as an outsider to them, and they seem to see little aversion for nasty behaviour towards others, even if such behaviour is unwarranted. Not to mention how many people act when behind the wheel of a car.
>> No. 42410 [Edit]
>>42409
Also, I was thinking a little more, and I might retract what I said about moderators and admins as part of my example. I've noticed that in imageboards specifically that admins, mods, and tripfags, not in the mode you mention, are particularly scorned. (Maybe "scorned" is not the word - but I definitely see major pushback between imageboard users and any authority; it may also be due to contrarianism.) As you said, it is uncouth to brag about being an oldfag, and I am almost thinking that this applies to those who try to call some sort of attention to their status, at all. I never really see the ass-kissing of mods/admins on imageboards that you see on forums and Reddit. There just seems to be something inherent in the design and innate culture of imageboards which prevents a solid hierarchy from forming. Although a "hierarchy" may exist, it is minimal, and it has little effect on imageboards.
>although I wouldn't really put tripfags in the hiearchy as they should be anons anytime they aren't using their trip for the designated purpose
I think that's a valid use for a trip. When I was referring to tripfags, I was referring more to the attentionwhore types who seem to want to have an "identity" on imageboards. But for instances where a trip may be needed, I wouldn't put them in the hierarchy, either.
>view all your past discussions, tainting the conversation.
Ah, yes, that is what I dislike precisely about non-anonymous forms of communication online. Having a post history allows users to infer more details about them than they directly share in a conversation. These details might be about aspects of themselves which they can not control, and some of the real-life dynamics start to leak into the internet. Not just a seniority bias seeps in, but many other pre-conceived biases others may have about you seep in, as well. This might be a controversial take, but I've noticed that the media tends to overwhelmingly paint imageboards as "misogynistic" and "racist." However, I was thinking that imageboards would almost be better for marginalized groups because everyone is able to be on an equal footing, provided you do not share details about yourself which would cause others to judge you based on pre-conceived notions of your characteristics, whether that be your looks, your wealth, or some other thing.
>I also think that in general ford drivers have begun to tend towards violent outbursts, although I'm not sure whether this has been a recent development or not, I have noticed more "normal people" becoming increasingly aggravated and quick tempered. I think it's a natural result or how hectic the world has become, as most people can't keep up so they either turn to drugs or they are eternally on edge and ready to snap, taking their anger out even when there was no need to do so.
I agree with you. I have noticed this, too. I'm not sure, but I've noticed that the world and the internet in general have skewed towards this way in 2016, but it may have been earlier than that. I guess people have become extremely polarized on all sides. All opinions are the wrong opinion to have because they will inevitably upset someone. It does not matter how benign or innocent what you say is; it can be twisted in a million different ways. But, to add to the second part of what you said, I also think it has to do with societal standards becoming increasingly unrealistic while it becomes more and more difficult to meet those standards due to the current state of the world. However, I don't think it's just causing aggression and violence, but I think it's causing people to look for strange ways of deluding themselves in order to be able to function. Everyone seems really obsessed with self-pathologization. If they look at themselves and see a characteristic that is "odd," then they immediately jump to suggesting that they are an "autist" or a "schizo" - not just in a joking manner - but it genuinely seems like there are a lot of people who genuinely think these things. I feel like people use these diagnoses to ease societal pressures on themselves and to be able to tell themselves that it is okay that they are not living up to the unrealistic standards that are in place. However, I also think that this is due to a breakdown in people's ability to develop an identity as a result of being unable to find a community in real life because everyone is so isolated; both due to social media usage and because no one really goes outside anymore. If they do, then they remain shut down. Otherwise, what is considered "normal" has become so narrow and confined, and I think that puts quite a bit of stress on people. Then, there is also the problem that there are just simply so many people on the planet, and jobs are limited, which creates a sense of fierce competitiveness to survive. This is also a struggle for those with atypical life circumstances who manage to find themselves "behind." But, even those without those circumstances people experience intense pressure.
Then, as a final small comment on how people act in cars, I'm honestly scared at how non-chalantly people take driving to be. When I first started driving, I had pretty severe anxiety about it, and I struggled with those implications - that I was driving a thousand pound vehicle that could kill anyone with ease. Then, there was the thought that one small mistake could send my insurance prices through the roof. It took me way longer to learn to drive than average for that reason. I effectively had to learn to dissociate from my emotions to be able to drive. Yet, others never seem to really think of these things.
>> No. 42418 [Edit]
> but I definitely see major pushback between imageboard users and any authority
It depends on the board I think. On 4chan this is definitely the case since probably many see the mods as only contributing to the problem rather than solving it. On TC there isn't any such disparity (in fact they blend in so seamlessly that I genuinely don't know if there are any mods besides Tohno himself). On the infamous orange-bar site, the mods are viewed fairly positively.

>I'm honestly scared at how non-chalantly people take driving to be
I can't drive for the same reason.
>> No. 42422 [Edit]
>>42418
>the infamous orange-bar site
Which site?
>> No. 42425 [Edit]
>>42422
hacker news
>> No. 42426 [Edit]
>>42418
>the mods are viewed fairly positively
There's only one guy doing it these days too.
>> No. 42427 [Edit]
>>42426
I was about to ask about Scott (sctb), but it seems you're right, he left around 2020 and now it's just Dan. That's fairly impressive. The overall moderation system isn't perfect (there's clear political and social bias in terms of which articles get flagged and automatically taken down), but in terms of direct human moderation Dan always seemed fairly hands-off.
>> No. 42429 [Edit]
>>42427
I pretty much agree.

>Dan always seemed fairly hands-off.
Even though he's being paid to do this, I cannot help but mention my appreciation for his rather even-handed and cool approach to moderation. Not many in his position would be able to do the same, as seen on other sites.
>> No. 42521 [Edit]
File 171270518757.jpg - (0.97MB , 1013x1433 , FSJod2WaAAEA6cp.jpg )
42521
Whenever music sounds interesting enough, people say it sounds like it comes from a video game. That's probably because video games are the only time they can remember hearing music with a strong melody and musical development.
>> No. 42548 [Edit]
File 171349155865.jpg - (1.03MB , 2126x3047 , 170865330432.jpg )
42548
I've noticed a pattern where women who represent themselves with a character that has pink hair and cat ears, is probably a cunt. Mikeneko and Nyanners come to mind. You think there's something to this? Maybe it's a form of compensation or concealment. Pink hair and cat ears are fine on their own. Together it's obviously excessive and saccharine, so only somebody with a twisted mind would go for that look.
>> No. 42549 [Edit]
File 171349626080.jpg - (264.59KB , 1000x1553 , GLfJRH1XgAAFVDP.jpg )
42549
>>42548
I think this is a bias where people assume that if someone presents themselves in a certain way they must be a nice person. It happens in real life too, like how others assume people into anime must be meek and nerdy and are surprised when they form their own groups in their communities like everyone else, then they complain about how nerds are surprisingly rude when it's their fault for judging people by their appearance and believing that stereotypes apply to everyone.
Or maybe my mind is twisted because I've always liked customizing my characters, profiles and avis on the internet in a way that can be described as excessive and saccharine. The internet is the only place I can do that, I simply like the way it looks.
Honestly, knowing myself, I can safely say people who do that tend to think in extremes but at least I'm self aware and try not to be a cunt. Assuming those women are influencers, they probably do it to keep up an extremely positive feminine image of themselves and gain followers.
>> No. 42550 [Edit]
>>42549
>bias where people assume that if someone presents themselves in a certain way they must be a nice person
I wonder if that's part of the reason why a lot of people on social media tend to have anime girls as profile pictures.
>> No. 42551 [Edit]
File 17135018081.jpg - (122.61KB , 500x500 , c51d6b30f882f57170d846eaed60a261.jpg )
42551
>>42550
I don't like misrepresenting myself, so I always use PFPs like this. It's Japan related, but also kind of weird and off-putting without being overtly risque.

Post edited on 18th Apr 2024, 9:44pm
>> No. 42552 [Edit]
>>42550
The ones that use cropped images from h-manga as their avatars are 9/10 times going to be the worst.
>> No. 42553 [Edit]
File 171353692770.png - (1.07MB , 986x1462 , 4369800987654.png )
42553
>>42548
>>42549
>>42550
i think you all are overanalyzing things on some level, i think most people just choose an image or a character they like without putting much thought into it. i've noticed i tend to usually set my pfp to girls, but it's usually because i either like the character or the design a lot (assuming i even put that much thought into it, there are a couple of times i've just chosen what the last saved image was).
in the case of nyanners, specifically, it's odd, though, since she seems to not even like things like that in the first place.
>>42552
but...some of my favorite characters are from ero-doujin...
>> No. 42556 [Edit]
>>42521
I love listening to 70's prog rock and electronic music and you can tell many video game composers took inspiration from them.
Like nobuo uematsu from triumvirat and ELP, or ZUN and ZUNTATA from yellow magic orchestra
>> No. 42559 [Edit]
>>42556
Not to mention the relatively many Japanese prog rock groups that are heavily influenced by ELP. There was even a "girl band" that played ELP-esque music.
>> No. 42560 [Edit]
>>42388
Here: https://arxiv.org/abs/2404.13813
It was common anecdotally that gpt-4 blew away gtranslate and even deepl for languages like Japanese, but here's some quantitative analysis of that.
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