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3312 No. 3312 [Edit]
Hey everyone,

I just read this cool article (1) about mulberry fruit extracts and how they might slow down skin aging, thanks to their polyphenols. It's on ScienceChronicle.org and talks about how these extracts help fight glycation and boost antioxidant functions.

This got me thinking – what's the real deal with polyphenols and anti-glycation? I mean, are all polyphenols equally good at this, or do some work better than others? And does their structure make a difference in how well they stop those AGEs from forming, especially for skin health?

Also, is there any debate among scientists about how effective these polyphenols really are? I’m curious to know what both sides are saying.

Would love to hear your thoughts or any cool studies you might know about!

(1) https://www.sciencechronicle.org/news/mulberry-extracts-anti-aging-antiglycation-antioxidant-evaluations/

Post edited on 3rd Jan 2024, 6:34pm
>> No. 3313 [Edit]
I can't tell if this is an absurdly high-effort version of the "miracle berry" spam ads, or an actual discussion topic from someone with biochem experience.

Unless there's other biochemists lurking here I think you might have to break things down for us layman a bit more: I have some vague knowledge of polyphenols being good antioxidants, but beyond that what's the particular role between anti-glycation and skin health? Is there a particular reason you're interested in skin health (it seems like other factors like metabolic health or basically any other body part would be more substantive).
>> No. 3315 [Edit]
Might be a spam ad, generated by AI.
>> No. 3316 [Edit]
Why would I want to extend my life and misery though?
>> No. 3317 [Edit]
>>3315
You may actually be right, that "sciencechronicle.org" website seems a bit suspicious, it basically has a pagerank of 0, not having any inbound links from a reputable site. And the only links to that site that exist on the web are either from random spam domains, or from other chans/forums, which use the same copy-pasted text as OP.

The thing that confuses me is that the site itself is fairly "clean", it doesn't have any trackers besides google analytics, no ads from what I can see, minimal JS. So what's the point of this: high effort SEO farming? I'm guessing the article may be auto-generated, but it seems to have valid relevant citations which is not really something that LLMs are known for.

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