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826 No. 826 [Edit]
I'll start with mine

It would be nice if the majority of the boomer, 60's counterculture, TV generation all just croak from this virus.
But it would be equally nice if this virus distrupted the public schooling system so that everything moves online.
The government then finds it an effective means of cutting costs as they don't have to payroll as many teachers, supply facilities, equipment, etc.
What this would mean is that a whole generation would not be socially conditioned
1. by their parents who are too busy with work to have time to babysit
2. from school which only consists of online courses rather than irl social pressuring/indoctrination

Without any social setting they would end up shaped by the non-conformist online community at large.
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>> No. 827 [Edit]
>>826
Naive. It will eventually blow over and everything will be largly unchanged. Lots of people will make a big show out of how they're going to improve various things and that'll be it. It'll have less impact than 9/11. It's just not lethal enough. The government's top priority also isn't cutting costs, they really don't give a shit since taxpayers are footing the bill willingly. Governments always tend to bloat. There's already plenty of useless people on payroll. Schools became a glorified day care center because that's what the overwhelming majority want.

>Without any social setting they would end up shaped by the non-conformist online community at large.
Or more likely, that would give an excuse to much more heavily legislate the internet. The internet would also become more conformist just because there's more people on it, which is already what's happening.

Post edited on 25th Mar 2020, 4:08pm
>> No. 828 [Edit]
People get socially conditioned online as well, in fact they do to a greater degree than in real life as the internet is global, they become part of a global hivemind.

>Without any social setting they would end up shaped by the non-conformist online community at large.

The online community is complete conformist, look at any website. People all act the same, they all regurgitate memes, opinions and phrases.
>> No. 829 [Edit]
>>828
>The online community is complete conformist
Yes, but there's far more options of what to conform to than in real life.
>> No. 830 [Edit]
>>829
Not really and people don't.
>> No. 831 [Edit]
>>830
If you live in a typical middle American town, your options are pretty limited. On the internet, there's tons of different tiny enclaves. There's people who use large imageboard, small imageboards, social media shit. There's people who like watching videos of animals getting hurt. Everybody adjusts their behavior at least a litte when they enter one such group.
>> No. 832 [Edit]
>>831
>On the internet, there's tons of different tiny enclaves.

And they are tiny for a reason, the vast majority of people don't use them and would not use them, they would stick to the large sites. And even on these enclaves popular culture and opinions seep in. These enclaves are just versions of Facebook with different hats on.
>> No. 833 [Edit]
>>832
That's still more variety than in real life. Also, stop putting an extra line between quotes and your text all the time.
>> No. 834 [Edit]
>>833
No there isn't. Because they all just adapt to a hivemind.

>Also, stop putting an extra line between quotes and your text all the time.

I refuse.
>> No. 835 [Edit]
>>834
I can always tell it's you because of that, you stubborn, thick-headed prick. Why do you still use the internet then? Everybody is so hopelessly less enlightened than you.
>> No. 863 [Edit]
>>826
It might put a bit of a damper on globalization. Hopefully it will lead nations to produce more of their essential goods locally instead of wasting natural resources by shipping things around the globe.
>> No. 864 [Edit]
>>863
In some places but unfortunately not everywhere, not here. The EU rulers are hell bent on sucking up to the plague rats. Yesterday they even assured China there will be no european sanctions over Hong Kong. I swear the entire Brussels circus exists only so that France and Germany might subdue their weak neighbours without being accused of imperialism. Their snotty liberal posturing goes right out the window when it's time to do big business with the nazis in Moscow and Beijing. EU is ran by whores and weasels.
>> No. 865 [Edit]
>>863
They will just have them sourced from some other poor nation which they are in the process of looking at anyway(India is now the second largest mobile phone producer in the world) as China is becoming too rich to exploit. We will have to wait for AI to reach a point where it can fill these roles whilst also being cheap and reliable enough for business to set up and maintain.
>> No. 895 [Edit]
I wish it good luck, because people are being dickheaded dogmatic ignoramusses about it.

I hope it slaloms around and piledrives the vaccine, or at least the vaccines of the west and WHO-darling countries.

You know why? Because these preachy scumbags authoritizing about it keep whining with two scripts. First, they whine that it'll be crucial for practically everyone to take the vaccine. Yet the other thing they whine about is how it'll also be extra-crucial for this vaccine to be eagerly given to counries that aren't making it.

It's as if it would kill these lowlife preachers to put two and two together, (and shove their dogmatic indignation in the handy spatious spot reserved for it up their asses for good measure), if half the people refuse to take the vaccine, then, guess what, right fucking there are your extra doses for sharing it with countries that can't take care of their own shit!

Ahhh ... I seem to have had a little epiphany ... the whole point of these pandemic proprieties is just to punish detached people! It's to punish those who aren't even the ones being supportive of the virus!

So I hope this hallowed vaccine has nasty side effects and causes common cold corona to be much nastier or something.
>> No. 896 [Edit]
I hope a vaccine gets made but there is no way I'm taking one, not with a developmental cycle like this. I'm not an anti-vac nutter but if ever a vaccine was liable to have issues it would be one made under a time frame like this one.

I suspect many will feel the same way and many young people are not going to want to get vaccinated anyway as they don't see any risk in getting the virus.
>> No. 897 [Edit]
>>896
I think young people are the ones taking the virus more seriously, with older generations being nuts who think it's fake.
>> No. 898 [Edit]
>>897
I can see how old people wouldn't care and how many young people would take it seriously. I'm not sure which are more likely too, I have a 50 year old uncle who is taking it so seriously that he took out his savings to buy silver and borrowed a sewing machine to make his own masks because he thinks society is going to collapse and that the this is a Chinese ploy and they are producing masks with holes in them and that they are also the ones buying all the toilet paper.
>> No. 900 [Edit]
>>826
Well, you got your fucking wish. I'm so glad that a generation I have nothing to do with was able to attend school online at the cost of everyone else's livelihood and the entire global economy. Why does it even matter to you how todays children are raised and taught? Did you have plans on socializing with them? Why are you wishing death on people that don't have anything to do with you? I never understood the mentality of people who wake up and say "wow, my life isn't complicated enough, I hope society collapses soon." It makes twice as less sense to hear someone speak that way on Tohnochan. Even if you are NEET, a depressed economy means that government assistance needs to be divided even further to accommodate more people and new media releases will decline both in number and quality because of cost-cutting. I had saved money towards traveling to Japan next year and every week I read about another store or attraction I was planning to visit closing permanently because of the virus.

>without any social setting they would end up shaped by the non-conformist online community at large

Online communities have always been centered around social pressure and confirming to a specific standard. Internet culture isn't separate from "outside" society and it hasn't been for decades. It's really astonishing to see how dense people are sometimes--absolutely no comprehension of reality whatsoever.
>> No. 901 [Edit]
Part of me envies kids going to school online. While I'm sure 99% of them hate it, I would have loved to have had this chance. I dropped out of high school because I just couldn't stand going there in person and being around all those people, on top of the teaching methods being so tedious and frustrating. Half the time we were just copying crap from text books anyway. What I wouldn't give to be able to ctrl+f then ctrl+C&V. The only human interaction I'm comfortable with is via a keyboard, back then we had to use paper and pencil for everything, and that shit hurt my hands like a bitch. Kids today are getting piss easy passes. Sure it's at the cost of social skills, relations, and actually learning anything, but the public school system in the US at least isn't exactly well known being all that great. It was infamous for letting kids pass on cruse control, but as I found personally it was like a prison. These schools are designed by the same architects who design prisons, and look the same before being pained. From the high (sometimes spiked or barbed)surrounding fences, guards on patrol, metal detectors, and the constant threat of being assaulted by fellow inmates... prisons even have better meals apparently. I just can't stress enough how much I hated school, and for better or worse kids are free from all that.
>> No. 902 [Edit]
>>901
It's probably a relief for those who hated doing presentations. I'm not sure if everyone does this, but I cannot extemporaneously verbally articulate coherent thoughts longer than one or two sentences. So I'd usually memorize presentations word for word. (Even memorizing bullet points was insufficient, since I somehow seem to lack the ability to think a few sentences into the future while speaking at the same time).
>> No. 903 [Edit]
>>902
There's video calls, so presentations are still possible, but it's easier to cheat with a script I guess. When I did presentations, how well it went depended on how well I knew the subject matter. If I actually knew what I was talking about, prior planning of what to say was actually a hindrance.
>> No. 904 [Edit]
>>901
>I dropped out of high school
>Part of me envies kids going to school online.

Then go to school ONLINE and get your GED or degree. Education is not something that suddenly becomes inaccessible once you become a certain age. Online classes have existed since the 1990s, COVID-19 did not start that phenomenon.

>Kids today are getting piss easy passes. Sure it's at the cost of social skills, relations, and actually learning anything.

It is at the cost of eight hundred thousand preventable deaths and counting? Is it at the cost of twenty two million people with potential lifelong health defects? It is at the cost of a shuttered global economy and hundreds of millions of people losing their way of making a living? I could go on. People have had the option to take online classes for years and most schools were already in the process of transitioning to online curriculum since around 2015. The fact that people can do Zoom classes is incomparable to the devastation caused by the outbreak. Only a sociopath would consider that as an even compromise.

>melodrama involving prison analogies

People who still dwell on the past about how awful and miserable their high school experience was are exactly the same as people who still wear varsity jackets and go to their reunions. You need to move on with your life. The way you describe those four years makes it seem like it was the only hardship you've ever faced before. I still don't understand why you're so preoccupied on how another generation is taught and how you think it's the pressing issue at-hand instead of the death and economic fallout caused by the virus, especially when you are not in school yourself.
>> No. 905 [Edit]
>>904
>Then go to school ONLINE and get your GED or degree.
You'd think that'd be possible, but it's not. I thought with covid I might have a chance to get a GED online, but no luck. Still have to go in person to testing centers. Besides, copy/pasting answers off google and pretending to pay attention over a zoom chat, is not the same thing as cramming for the GED test.

>Education is not something that suddenly becomes inaccessible once you become a certain age.
My counselors and teachers told me 24 was my cut off point for continuing with high school.
Also, while technically you can attend college at any age, modern society has made it increasingly awkward to attend it the longer you wait from highschool. It's pretty much just something for 20 year olds the way they have it. That's not to mention how hard it is for older people to learn new things compared to children while their brains are developing.

Also also, the rest of your post makes me wonder if you're confusing me for someone else, or if my one post in this thread really ticked you off that much. I'm not particularly hung up on it, and I've had far worse experiences in life. I simply felt like commenting on something I saw others talking about. Sorry if I offended you.
>> No. 906 [Edit]
>>905
I'm not offended, I was under the assumption that you were OP and worded my post as if you and >>826 were the same person. If it isn't the case, then it's my mistake since your post is seen in an entirely different context if it was supplementing the OP.

>Also, while technically you can attend college at any age, modern society has made it increasingly awkward to attend it the longer you wait from highschool. It's pretty much just something for 20 year olds the way they have it. That's not to mention how hard it is for older people to learn new things compared to children while their brains are developing.

That varies depending on what school you attend, it becomes less of an issue if you enroll online. Certain schools are marketed for on-campus networking activities and have a demographic that is almost exclusively 18-25 year olds. Other schools are marketed for people just seeking a diploma and have a larger ratio of people over 25. I chose not to continue education after high school.
>> No. 907 [Edit]
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907
>>906
I don't know why you're getting all excited. First you ask why someone would care about the education of people who aren't part of their generation, then you start talking about how many people are dying and the economy. If it doesn't personally affect you too much, why care? Things needed a change for the better. Something drastic. Break a few eggs.

As a uni student, I'm pretty happy about the situation. If I was still in high school, I'd be ecstatic. A relative of mine is a teacher, and he's pretty happy about it too. He doesn't want to teach snotty kids in person. Hollywood is shut down too, which is great. Our society is sick and this is a bit of chemo.

It's unfortuante that your Japan trip has been been affected, but I don't get why you're getting so morally uppity about having a relaxed attitude. Things were already bad beforehand. Automation will put plenty of people out of a job soon enough too.

Even with media, eventually this will probably lead to some great stuff. Adversity is the best inspiration.
>> No. 908 [Edit]
>>907
>Something drastic. Break a few eggs.
You know what got the US out of the great depression? freaking WW2!
>> No. 909 [Edit]
>>908
I don't think it's possible to definitively say that the wartime production and spending of ww2 is what "ended" the great depression (mainly because macro-economics barely counts as a "science" in that you can't run experiments to verify hypotheses so you're left to infer stuff aposteriori). The Austrian economic school of thought is that the recovery happened naturally (helped due to the suspension of FDR's new deal policies which the Austrians believe prolonged the recovery period), and reduction in taxes post ww2 helped stimulate businesses.
But yes, either way ww2 shook things up enough and resulted in a bunch of changes, some combination of which (although it's up for debate which specific policies were responsible) did help the economy.
>> No. 910 [Edit]
>>909
>mainly because macro-economics barely counts as a "science" in that you can't run experiments to verify hypotheses so you're left to infer stuff aposteriori
More people need to read this.
>> No. 911 [Edit]
>>910
They obscure this fact further by dressing up regressions and calling it "econometrics," as if to somehow convince themselves that fancy regressions on data chosen after the fact somehow makes everything less hand-wavy.

Amusingly if someone ever did manage to formulate a macroeconomic model that worked well enough (i.e. actually had any predictive power), they'd probably keep it a secret and use it for their own gains.

Post edited on 21st Aug 2020, 10:13pm
>> No. 912 [Edit]
>>907
>If it doesn't personally affect you too much, why care?

Everyone is affected by the economy. Everyone, including you and I can die from the virus. If you disagree, consider that the current death toll of the virus already spawned a global recession that dwarfs the one that began in 2008.

>Things needed a change for the better. Something drastic. Break a few eggs.

The fallout from COVID-19 is not society in the process of changing for the better. Anyone who thinks otherwise is deluded. You may not be aware of it, but there is a world that exists outside of your college campus.
>> No. 913 [Edit]
>>912
>consider that the current death toll of the virus already spawned a global recession that dwarfs the one that began in 2008.
Not really. It was the response to the virus that spawned this recession. Sweden knows what's up.
>> No. 914 [Edit]
>>913
I'm surprised that I have to clarify this, but it isn't a literal statement. The fallout is from the response to the deaths, not from the deceased no longer contributing to the economy. I don't know why someone would interpret it as that.
>> No. 919 [Edit]
>>914
>I don't know why someone would interpret it as that.
I want the distinction to be made because seemingly many people have this idea that the virus is an autonomous being who's mankind's archenemy. The anthropomorphism allows a warlike response and the vindication of the people who fucked up during this shitstorm.
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